My First Double-Slice Layer Cake Quilt

Yes, the name makes me hungry, but since I gave up white flour three years ago, I don’t eat cake, so I’ll content myself with making a layer cake quilt.

Layer cakes are packages of coordinating fabrics cut in 10-inch squares. I used squares from Connecting Threads and an instructional video from the Missouri Quilt Co. to make this quilt:

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It was fun to make, and quick! If I hadn’t been fighting illness this past month, it would have been done weeks ago. The backing fabric came from a thrift store, where I found a set of homemade curtains in fabric I adored. I ripped out the seams and sewed the two panels together, and for a few bucks I had my backing:

Here’s the video I used, in case you want to try your hand at this (warning, it’s addictive! I’m planning to make another one soon.)

Two Finished Projects

When I was homeschooling, I tried to make time for sewing, and sometimes I actually got some, thanks to my husband who watched the kids so I could sew uninterrupted. Back then, I promised myself that my post-homeschooling life would include plenty of sewing. And so it does!

Here’s what I made in July and August (machine-pieced, machine-quilted):

Stretched Stars

Stretched Stars

I also finished a project I began last fall, and worked on while watching DVDs with my husband in the evenings:

Embroidered pillow (downloadable pattern from www.connectingthreads.com)

Embroidered pillow (downloadable pattern from www.connectingthreads.com)

Both were fun projects. I have more quilts on the way but haven’t found a new hand-stitching project yet.

Overstock Sale! Save 75% off Guide to Homeschooling in print

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My book,The Imperfect Homeschooler’s Guide to Homeschooling (retail $11.95), is on sale for just $2.99 in print! That’s a 75% savings….click HERE to snag a copy.

Prefer eBooks? We’ve put the eBook on sale for $2.99, too. It’s available at Amazon for the Kindle and at Barnes and Noble for the Nook.

Are Introverted Children Being Drugged?

In light of my recent (see archives for March and April 2014) series on introverts, I’d like to add this article, which speculates that introverted children are being misdiagnosed as having special needs or even being mentally ill, when in reality there’s nothing wrong with them. Worse, parents are most often the ones pushing for medication for their children who don’t fit the prescribed mold.

How awful for these children! As one commenter put it:

I’m shy and bookish I’m not mentally ill I’m introvert living in a extroverts world.

Pre-Teens, Internet Access and Attempted Murder

A tragedy just occurred in a town not far from here. Two 12-year-old girls played out a terrible fantasy based on a website they often visited that resulted in them luring their 12-year-old friend into the woods and stabbing her: she survived but is clinging to life.

The owner of the website denies that it’s anything but a literature site. But according to the two girls, it propelled them to do something very evil.

Some people are going to say that the website should be shut down. Others will say that it was never meant for children in the first place.

But the bottom line is that these girls had access to the site. Their parents may not have even known about the site, because thanks to today’s technology, anyone can have easy and private access to anything on the Web.

It seems so long ago that we had a computer set up in our dining room, where we could supervise Internet surfing and thus allowed our children limited access to the Internet. As they grew older, they could afford their own computers in their own rooms. At that point, we could no longer see what they were accessing, but they were nearly adults by then and we had to trust them.

Now, young children have total access to the Internet, and to the many good and bad things available on it. Kids are being bullied on Facebook and other social sites. Some have committed suicide because of that.

Once, it was considered entirely reasonable for parents to strictly limit their children’s intake of all forms of media, and even of books they considered inappropriate. But since the ascent of the Internet, it seems that most kids are allowed free access to anything they can find. And now we’re seeing the sad results of that policy.