The Joy of Making Baby Booties

IMG_20160513_1934236_rewindWe have another grandchild on the way, I’m tickled to report. In fact, Grandchild #3  is due to arrive within a month or less.

Several months ago, I decided to make some baby booties for her that I had seen in a wonderful book called Amy Butler’s Little Stitches for Little Ones. I had no idea how long it would take to make a cute pair of booties (much less two pairs!), but as it turned out, bootie-making is the perfect occupation for someone recovering from an illness as I was this past spring. The bootie-making process was slow-going, with a fair amount of hand-stitching at the end, but it was worth the time it took.

I gave the booties to my daughter at her baby shower a few weeks ago, and she was delighted with them. The first pair was made from vintage fabric, and the second pair was made from the scraps of the Star Wars quilt I made last Christmas. I can’t wait to see my little granddaughter wear her booties this fall!

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Grant Park Table Runner

IMG_20160609_1434550_rewindI just finished this table runner made from the Grant Park line by Moda. I bought some charm packs and a bit of extra yardage from a cute little quilt shop in Pecatonica, IL, while out shop-hopping with a friend a few years ago, and finally got around to using it.

I love precuts because the fabrics in them are designed to go together. That’s a great blessing for those of us who love to sew but aren’t gifted with the artist’s eye; we just don’t know how to pick out fabrics that go well together! But check out how nice the Grant Park line looks:

IMG_20160609_1433316_rewindI machine quilted this runner in a matter of minutes using my supermachine, the Brother PQ-1500s:

IMG_20160609_1435036_rewindAnd I pieced the back using the extra yardage that I’m so glad I bought:

IMG_20160609_1435315_rewindI don’t know how many quilt shops still carry this line, but I see it’s available on Etsy; I imagine you could find it on eBay as well.

“Hi, Reindeer!”

IMG_20160418_145634This little deer statue came with our house. I left it in the yard for a few years without really thinking about it, but one of its ears is missing and it’s kind of cheesy-looking, so I figured I’d get rid of it before long.

But that was before I discovered that when my grandson comes to visit, he says “Hi, Reindeer!” to the deer before coming into the house, and bids it “Bye, Reindeer!” when he leaves.

Grandma says the deer gets a reprieve. :)

Engaging Your Child with Down Syndrome

I have an email from Catherine, who writes:

Hi Barbara I came across your blog today so glad I did
I am homeschooling my son aged 10yrs who also had Down syndrome he pretty much refuses to engage and am looking for any advice thanks

I’ll answer this publicly, for the sake of parents who may find this post in the future.

Catherine, when you say your son “refuses to engage,” I’m assuming you mean he’s not interested in sitting and learning with you.

Of course, there’s a wide variety of abilities and behaviors among 10-year-olds with Down syndrome, so it’s hard to know exactly what your son is like, but I do recall that Josh, my son with Ds, was not very interested in many of the things I did with him during our years of homeschooling, even though I tried so many different things in an effort to pique his interest and get him involved in learning.

Perhaps our greatest successes were spurred on once I discovered how competitive he was. I learned this by accident. A relative gave us a gaming system, something I’d successfully kept out of our house while raising our three older children. Once this thing was in the house, it quickly became the favorite new toy of all the kids and my husband as well, and the next thing I knew, they were teaching Josh to play on it. He became very good at it; in fact, his love of video games continues to this day.

But what that showed me was that I could reach him through games. I bought some “Concentration” type memory games, and we began playing those at the end of each day after he had successfully completed his schoolwork. This gave him an incentive to get his other work done. His goal, of course, was to beat me. Given the state of my memory after raising four children, that wasn’t hard most of the time. His love of winning fed his desire to play the games.

I also used flash cards as games. I’d hold up a card, and if he got the problem or question right, he kept the card. If he got it wrong, I kept the card. Whoever ended up with the most cards, won. He just loved doing flash cards once we scored in this way. Again, his desire to win kept him engaged.

Another technique that worked for us was using his interests to make lessons easier for him. For instance, he loved doing jigsaw puzzles. Since he needed to practice his speech sounds each day, I had spent years trying to get him to repeat these sounds back to me. But once I began rewarding each successful speech sound with a puzzle piece, practicing his speech sounds became so much easier. He quickly worked through the list, amassing pieces that he could then assemble when we were through. It was amazing how much better that method worked than all my previous years of verbally coaxing him.

Ultimately, I just had to keep trying until I found things that worked with Josh. For instance, I tried for years, from the time he was tiny, to teach him the alphabet. I used every method I could think of, and more that I found in books. But after he got an “Arthur” software game for his birthday, he learned his alphabet quickly, because one of the screens on that game showed Arthur in his room with the alphabet arranged around the top of the walls. All Josh had to do was click on a letter and he would hear the name of the letter in Arthur’s voice. I couldn’t believe how quickly he picked up all the letters once he got that game. Clearly that was the way to reach him when it came to learning the alphabet. Who knew?

The bottom line, Catherine, is that you must keep trying until you find something that works. This will always be true with your son. Even now, there are times when Josh challenges us in various ways and we need to keep trying until we come up with a solution that works for him and us. This is just life with our son, so we’ve gotten used to it. You will, too.

Best wishes on your homeschooling journey, Catherine!

 

Clothes for the Grandkids

I loved sewing for my children when they were little. I don’t know how I found the time to do so, but I did. Now I’m having a ball making clothes for my grandkids, and I don’t have to squeeze sewing sessions in during nap times or late at night because I have much more free time these days.

Our grandson loves the Avengers and anything that has to do with super heroes, so buying this fabric was a no-brainer:

IMG_20160304_2042430_rewindNot long ago during our weekly Skype visit, he modeled his shorts; his mother says he wears them all the time. I was so pleased!

I also made a dress with matching panties for our granddaughter. But she just started crawling this week, so I’m not sure how often they’ll be putting her in dresses now. Maybe she can wear this to church though:

IMG_20160304_2043269_rewindI made both items on my vintage Bernina using fabric from JoAnn Fabrics, which joins Hobby Lobby as my only remaining shopping-for-fabric-in-person options now that Hancock Fabrics is going out of business (sniffle!).