O is for Outdoors

ABCs of Homeschooling - Copy

O is for outdoors. When I was a schoolgirl, I lived for recess. Those 15 minutes on the sunny playground were a brief and much-appreciated respite from the boredom of the classroom.

Homeschooled kids are fortunate to be able to go outside far more often than schoolchildren; in fact, much of their learning can be done outside, whether it’s sitting on a blanket reading, or catching and observing insects or worms before letting them loose again.

While there are health benefits to being outside, such as gaining Vitamin D from sunshine and being able to breathe fresh air, there are also emotional benefits of exercise and play, which create endorphins that help our children feel good. How fortunate homeschooled children are to be able to enjoy the outdoors during the week instead of just on weekends!

 

Now available: the 3rd edition of Life Prep for Homeschooled Teenagers, completely revised and expanded. Check it out!

 

L is for Location

ABCs of Homeschooling - Copy

L is for location. There’s a saying in real estate: “Location, location, location.” It means that no matter how beautifully built and decorated a house is, if it’s located next to a garbage dump, it’s not worth as much as a house with a park-like setting.

Location is also important when homeschooling your children. They won’t learn as much or have as much fun if they’re forced to sit in the same spot day after day to “do school.” Try varying your routine. Spend time in the park watching birds, at the grocery store weighing vegetables, in your basement finger-painting, and out in your neighborhood on a rainy day checking puddles for frogs. A variety of locations can make homeschooling more interesting and fun for your children…and you.

(Just out in print: the 3rd edition of Life Prep for Homeschooled Teenagers, completely revised and expanded. Check it out!)

B is for Balance

ABCs of Homeschooling - Copy

B is for balance. Homeschooling can take up every single day if you let it. Some curriculum products will literally fill your day from 9 to 5; if you sign your children up for every outside activity that interests them, you could end up with a schedule that will burn out you and your children simultaneously! Instead, strive for balance:

Balance teaching time with free-learning opportunities.

Balance inside time with outdoor time.

Balance math time with art time.

Balance time as a group with time alone with each child.

Balance is the key to long-term homeschooling.

 

Just out in print: the 3rd edition of Life Prep for Homeschooled Teenagers, completely revised and expanded. Check it out!